The Competitive Edge in Central and Eastern Europe

SOFIA BULGARIA - MAY 5: View of the Ivan Vazov National Theatre in Sofia on May 5 2016. Sofia is the largest city and capital of Bulgaria.

Joining the EU has unlocked robust GDP growth and continues to aggregate positive energy in the Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries. Adhering to the common market has brought a surge in trade, positive institutional changes and improvements in the business environment. However for many countries, it has also led to a migration of the labour force, which could affect long-term economic growth prospects. Continue reading The Competitive Edge in Central and Eastern Europe

Will a Two-speed European Union Side-line the Visegrad Four?

During the summit marking the 25th anniversary of the Maastricht Treaty, in December 2016, the president of the European Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker, called for a move forward with a two-speed Europe and also for the creation of a different orbit for those EU Member States who do not wish to take part in all facets of EU integration. If implemented, this approach will have far-reaching consequences for the CEE region, especially for the countries of the Visegrad group (the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, and Slovakia), which could effectively be side-lined in a two-speed Europe. Continue reading Will a Two-speed European Union Side-line the Visegrad Four?

The CEE Region Is Making Advances in Prioritising Waste-to-Energy Projects

The European Commission has been preparing a technical communication that focusses on waste-to-energy (WtE). It aims to explore the opportunities this offers, particularly with regard to the synergies between resource and energy efficiency. The communication was scheduled to be published at the end of 2016 together with the reviewed Renewable Energy Directive. Continue reading The CEE Region Is Making Advances in Prioritising Waste-to-Energy Projects

Are Labour Shortages Driving Economic Growth?

The global economic environment continues to be challenging. The ‘wounds’ inflicted by the global financial crisis of 2008 have not yet healed completely and world economic growth remains rather subdued. This particularly applies to the advanced countries and especially to the Euro Zone, which is the most important trading partner for the Eastern European countries.  Continue reading Are Labour Shortages Driving Economic Growth?

World Bank’s Doing Business Report 2016 Resume For Emerging Europe

Almost every single economy in emerging Europe implemented at least one reform in the last year to improve their business environment. In consequence, as many as 16 economies in the region are featured in the Top 50 of the World Bank’s Doing Business 2016 report. Emerging Europe speaks to Rita Ramalho, Manager of the World Bank–IFC Doing Business, who has compiled a resume about the emerging Europe region especially for us, about how the reforms introduced have helped make doing business easier across the region. Continue reading World Bank’s Doing Business Report 2016 Resume For Emerging Europe

For Migrants, the V4 Countries Are a Mere Stop On Their Way To the West

The V4 countries have expressed their strong disapproval for the refugee quota plan suggested by the European Commission and received a lot of criticism from the Old member states. But what really happened that the old EU member states are trying to chaotically solve the migration crisis through the bureaucratic quota system which create an artificial burden for the new member states, which are not the final destination for the migrants? Continue reading For Migrants, the V4 Countries Are a Mere Stop On Their Way To the West

Poland Has Set the Bar Too Low, It’s Time To Aim Higher

In a recent interview, Professor Marek Belka, Governor of the National Bank of Poland, discussed the largest problems of Polish economy which I have been trying to bring up for a few years now. And that problem is that Poland’s idea of competitive advantages is based on low labour costs. As a result, Poland does not produce much. Instead the country is a large assembly line for international companies, which — trying to reduce their employees’ salaries — open new factories and shared cervices centres. Continue reading Poland Has Set the Bar Too Low, It’s Time To Aim Higher