Falling into Old Ways in 2017? Ukraine’s Struggle for Functioning Economic Institutions

The turning of the calendar to a new year is a natural point to reappraise the legacy of the year just passed; searching for clues as to what will come and what must be avoided in the future. Such an exercise is particularly useful in the case of Ukraine, which has a large milestone coming up. February 2017 marks three years since (now) former President Yanukovych fled to Russia with large quantities of Ukraine’s treasury, a signature event which also sparked three years of tangible economic reform and political change.  Continue reading Falling into Old Ways in 2017? Ukraine’s Struggle for Functioning Economic Institutions

Breaking With Imitations of the Past

As I look forward into 2017, I see great developmental opportunities for Poland. There is an opportunity for an investment boom whose range and significance will propel the Polish economy into the future, breaking with imitations of the past. We have laid a solid groundwork for fostering sovereign savings and encouraging solidarity in the consumption of growth fruits, whilst improving public finances at the same time. But looking at foreign circumstances, we must remember one thing: today, in the globalisation era, the only certainty is uncertainty. Continue reading Breaking With Imitations of the Past

The Right to Water: Who Can Change Today’s Situation?

In November 2016, Slovenia amended its constitution to make access to drinkable water a fundamental right for all citizens and to stop it being commercialised, thus becoming the first European Union country to include the right to water in its principal document. Only 15 other countries across the world have done this, before Slovenia, according to Rampedre (the online Permanent World Report on the Right to Water). Continue reading The Right to Water: Who Can Change Today’s Situation?

Are Labour Shortages Driving Economic Growth?

The global economic environment continues to be challenging. The ‘wounds’ inflicted by the global financial crisis of 2008 have not yet healed completely and world economic growth remains rather subdued. This particularly applies to the advanced countries and especially to the Euro Zone, which is the most important trading partner for the Eastern European countries.  Continue reading Are Labour Shortages Driving Economic Growth?

The Netherlands’ Objection to the Ukraine-EU Association Agreement could be Costly to Europe

Dutch Prime Minister, Mark Rutte, recently announced that his country is unlikely to give the green light to the EU Association’s agreement with Ukraine, following an improvised civic campaign against the deal. The Dutch government is faced with a difficult choice between sacrificing a treaty with immense geopolitical significance and defending it to its own political detriment, thus adding more fuel to the Euro-sceptic fire in the country. Continue reading The Netherlands’ Objection to the Ukraine-EU Association Agreement could be Costly to Europe

The Global Outsourcing Industry — the Rise of the Phoenix

Outsourcing is being transformed; digitalisation, automation, the Internet of Things, these are only a few of the elements that are shaping it now. All of these factors, as well as the outcome of the recent EU referendum in the United Kingdom and the subsequent Brexit are all coming together to reduce the existing out sourcing landscape to ashes, not only on the domestic market here in the British Isles but also further afield.  Continue reading The Global Outsourcing Industry — the Rise of the Phoenix

United or Divided? Europe in the Face of the Challenges of Tomorrow

2016 has been a year of great challenges for Europe: the migration crisis which has brought up a discussion on how to tackle the immigration issue and the migrant quotas within the European Union; the terrorist attacks, the latest in Nice, France, where over 80 innocent people celebrating France’s National Day were killed; the last few weeks’ notable intensification of ceasefire violations in eastern Ukraine; the NATO Summit in Warsaw which has resulted in four multinational battalions being deployed to the bloc’s eastern flank and finally, the results of the EU referendum in the United Kingdom. Continue reading United or Divided? Europe in the Face of the Challenges of Tomorrow

Measuring Growth of Societies with GDP Alone Shows an Incomplete Picture

Recent statistics, for example, those from the Brookings Institution, prove there have been impressive reductions in the percentage of people living in poverty. Is the problem solved and should we all applaud? Well, no, as progress in improving people’s lives has been uneven at best. Often, economic growth has depended on industrial, agricultural, and economic processes that are not environmentally sustainable and which, in many cases, produce social inequity. While it was once assumed that economic growth would solve most problems, it is now clear that social and environmental improvements do not necessarily accompany sustainable economic growth.  Continue reading Measuring Growth of Societies with GDP Alone Shows an Incomplete Picture

Will European Business and Institutions Bolster the New Trends That Have Appeared in Belarus?

It’ll take at least a $1.5 worth of net foreign direct investment (FDI) to stimulate economic growth in Belarus in 2016. These words were said by Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko, in his annual Address to the Belarusian Nation and National Assembly. A statement of this calibre would seem to be targeting European investors, given the EU Foreign Affairs Council’s decision to lift the bulk of the restrictive measures against Belarus.  Continue reading Will European Business and Institutions Bolster the New Trends That Have Appeared in Belarus?