Road & Rail Infrastructure

There is enormous potential for investment in modernising rail infrastructure in the CEE region. Poland is recipient of the largest proportion of EU Cohesion Policy funding, at €83.5 billion for 2014 to 2020, more than the €68.1 billion for the previous round for 2007 to 2013.The Polish government has invested, €1.2 billion in rail in 2013, bumping that up to €1.7 billion in 2014 and totalling €6.8 billion in rail infrastructure between 2013-2015. That’s along with a cap in EU investment standing at €10.6 billion for 2014-2020. Foreign investment, expertise and supply services are still needed to meet the sector’s needs.
There is also opportunity in the supply and post completion in railway regeneration in Bulgaria. A top priority for the government is development of railway infrastructure and improvement of intermodality across several railway connections. They plan to balance development 50-50 between North and South Bulgaria (rail and road) with a total value of projects in the railway sector amounting to about €1 billion. The budget for 2014 to 2020 is expected at €1.6 billion.
Hungary is raising line speeds, with investment plans for renovations, for 2012 to 2015, at a cost of €75 million. The Romanian government has a memorandum on intermodal solutions for attracting freight, the European Investment bank approving a €49.2 million co-finance for railway construction worth €285 million.

There is enormous potential for investment in modernising rail and road infrastructure in the CEE region, with the FDI, expertise and supply services to come with it. Poland has the largest allocation of EU Cohesion Policy funds, with a total of €6.8 billion to be invested in rail infrastructure between 2013-2015, €8.7 billion in extending roads between 2014 to 2020.

Bulgaria is investing €1 billion towards upgrading roads, including the completion of the Struma highway and construction of the Hemus highway, with funding opportunities in the Black Sea highway to be explored. The improvement of intermodality across several railway connections is also key, with a total value of projects in the sector amounting to about €1 billion within an available budget of €1.6 billion for this funding round.

Hungary is raising rail line speeds, with investment plans for renovations, at a cost of €75 million over the next three years, while Romania has a memorandum on intermodal solutions for attracting freight, the European Investment bank approving a €49.2 million co-finance for railway construction worth €285 million.

The Czech Republic is currently constructing 88.8 kilometres of road, while Lithuania’s aims to complete the first stage of the trans-European Rail Baltica route, in partnership with Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, in 2015. The 8.25 km Palanga bypass is the first PPP construction project in the country, at a cost of €35.8 million, while Serbia’s road upgrades are estimated at a cost of €390 million over the next five years. Meanwhile, Croatia has allocated €8.61 billion of EU funds to transport infrastructure, particularly railways.

Read a more detailed article about road construction in Europe.