Poland Government’s Development Plan and the EBRD’s Role

Warsaw EBRD annual meeting

Although Poland has been one of the best performing European economies for many years, the government wants the country to do even better. The sustainable development plan that was launched last year by Deputy Prime Minister, Mateusz Morawiecki, aims to make the economy “more dynamic”. It is based on five pillars: reindustrialisation, development of innovative companies, capital for development, foreign expansion and sustainable social and regional development. Continue reading Poland Government’s Development Plan and the EBRD’s Role

The Competitive Edge in Central and Eastern Europe

SOFIA BULGARIA - MAY 5: View of the Ivan Vazov National Theatre in Sofia on May 5 2016. Sofia is the largest city and capital of Bulgaria.

Joining the EU has unlocked robust GDP growth and continues to aggregate positive energy in the Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries. Adhering to the common market has brought a surge in trade, positive institutional changes and improvements in the business environment. However for many countries, it has also led to a migration of the labour force, which could affect long-term economic growth prospects. Continue reading The Competitive Edge in Central and Eastern Europe

Ukraine Can Learn from Poland’s Economic History

In 1990, GDP per capita in Poland and Ukraine was roughly the same and amounted to some $1,600. By the end of 2016, Polish GDP grew to $12,700. In 2013, GDP per capita in Ukraine equalled $4,200 but the recent recession has caused it to fall again, to some $2,000.

Leszek Balcerowicz is a former Polish deputy prime minister, and he is known for implementing the Polish economic transformation programme in the 1990s: this was a shock therapy that is commonly referred to as the Balcerowicz Plan. He is a former governor of the National Bank of Poland, and currently, he is Ukrainian President, Petro Poroshenko’s, representative in the cabinet of ministers. He spoke to Andrew Wrobel about Poland’s transformation in the 1990s and the current government’s economic growth plans, as well as his ideas for the economic development of Ukraine. Continue reading Ukraine Can Learn from Poland’s Economic History

Lesson for Polish Cities – Are They Learning?

Cities should not only be smart, as the popular urban development trend assumes, but they should also be permanently learning. The first person to write about learning regions and cities was Richard Florida. He believed that a city operates as an assemblage of science and ideas, thus creating a friendly environment and infrastructure which enable the smooth transfer of knowledge as the engine of economic growth. By attracting creative and enterprising people, growth may develop that is based, not on coal and steel, but on knowledge and information. Continue reading Lesson for Polish Cities – Are They Learning?