News

Elsewhere in emerging Europe

A selection of articles about emerging Europe published elsewhere this week, all of which are well worth your time.

New state-sanctioned textbooks, part of a government shakeup of Hungary’s education system, are causing deep unease among some of the country’s teachers and publishers.

Full story here.

Romania is continuing to prop up its ailing coal sector, blatantly ignoring EU state aid rules, even as the country claims to be defending EU values while holding the rotating presidency of the bloc, writes Alexandru Mustață at Euroactiv.

Full story here.

A female member of Georgia’s parliament is vowing to fight back as another sex-tape scandal rocks the former Soviet republic just as it hoped to shed its chauvinist image following the election of the country’s first female president.

Full story here.

Ukraine’s decentralisation is making the country more resilient and is helping with the process of post-Soviet democratisation, says New Eastern Europe.

Full story here.

Can a far-right Croatian media outfit that had a reputation for fake news and hate-mongering make money by ‘going straight’?

Full story here.

Belarus wants you to think it’s turning over a new leaf, says Amy Mackinnon in Foreign Policy, but its muddled media clampdown could jeopardise warming of relations with the West.

Full story here.

From Budapest, Szandra earns a living as a webcam model. Her daily routine consists of undressing and performing for anonymous clients on the internet. Arte carries out an investigation into a flourishing web industry.

Full story (video) here.

Portishead singer Beth Gibbons’ concert with the Polish National Radio Symphony — a performance of Henryk Górecki’s Symphony No. 3 — will be the focus of a live album due out in March.

Full story here.

American Silvia Foti grew up on stories about Jonas Noreika’s anti-Communist exploits in Lithuania. Then she learned he called the shots in cities where 14,500 Jews were murdered.

Full story here.